Home Archives June 2009 Port feels global shipping pain

Port feels global shipping pain

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Monday, June 01, 2009

As shipping traffic slowed all over the world, the number of vessel calls at the Port of Portland fell 35% and container traffic dropped 26% during the first three months of 2009. The Port moved fewer containers and automobiles in 2008, but grain and mineral tonnage remained relatively flat. Though it’s the sixth-largest U.S. port on the West Coast, Portland receives only 21% of Seattle’s and just 7% of Los Angeles’ valuable container traffic.

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