Philanthropy boosts recruitment efforts

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Wednesday, February 01, 2006

According to the Center for Corporate Citizenship at Boston College, a company that establishes itself as a leading corporate citizen through philanthropy is not only likely to achieve measurable bottom-line benefits. It is also likely to improve recruitment; increase staff morale, performance and retention; enrich team building; and contribute to employee skill development.

Employees want to work for companies that reflect their values and display a concern for social principles as well as profits. In the 2004 Cone CorporateCitizenship Study, 81% of Americans polled said that a company’s commitment to a social issue is important when deciding where to work.

Many companies have found that involving employees in corporate citizenship sends a clear message that it cares about its employees. According to a 2001 Boston College report, employees who think highly of a company’s giving program also show a strong sense of loyalty to the company. Among employees who were aware of their employer’s support for community activities, more than 35% said they felt more committed to their jobs.

 

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