Trade steps up

| Print |  Email
Wednesday, February 01, 2006


Strong housing markets deserve much of the credit for the recent strength of the Pacific Northwest economy. But don’t overlook the importance of growing international trade. New state-level data on 2005 merchandise exports show the Pacific Northwest on pace to break by a wide margin 1999’s record of $52.4 billion in exports.

Washington exports are turning around due to resurgent production at Boeing. Aircraft, because of their high value, tend to overshadow other Washington exports. Aircraft accounted for two-thirds of Washington’s 2002 exports, 58% of 2003’s total and 51% of 2004’s.

After aircraft, Washington’s big export categories include (among others) cereals, electrical and industrial machinery, wood exports grew at a strong 22% in 2003 and 17% in 2004. Japan, Canada, China, Taiwan and Korea were Washington’s leading 2004 export destinations.

After a red-hot 2004 (exports were up 39%), Idaho’s export growth slowed in 2005. The top three categories of Idaho exports in 2004 all were related to high tech: digital integrated circuits — think Micron Technology memory  chips — plus computer parts and other integrated circuits. The United Kingdom was Idaho's top 2004 customer, followed by Canada, Singapore, Taiwan and Japan.

Oregon had the slowest export growth in the first three quarters of 2005. Computer logic chips made by Intel factories in Oregon are among the state’s leading exports. Oregon high-tech exports have yet to recover fully to the peak reached in 2000, the year of the dotcom bubble burst. Top destinations for Oregon exports in 2004 were, in order, Canada, Japan, Korea, China and the Philippines.

In another aspect of international trade, traffic continues to rise at the West Coast’s principal container ports. Through October, the Port of Seattle handed 1.12 million 20-foot equivalent containter units (or TEUs), up 29% from the corresponding 2004 stretch. At the Port of Tacoma, TEU traffic was up 17%.

— Excerpted from Marple’s Pacific Northwest Letter, editor Michael Parks. For information on this biweekly report on Northwest economic trends, visit www.marples.com.

 

More Articles

Powerbook Perspective

January-Powerbook 2015
Friday, December 12, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

A conversation with Oregon state economist Josh Lehner.


Read more...

MBA Perspective

February 2015
Tuesday, January 27, 2015
BY KIM MOORE

Robin Anderson, dean of the Pamplin School of Business, University of Portland: "You need people who are comfortable leading in ambiguity."


Read more...

Will Medford Ever Be Cool?

February 2015
Friday, January 23, 2015
BY DAN COOK | PHOTOS BY JASON E. KAPLAN

A real-estate developer and a Lithia Motors executive aim to revamp the city's forlorn downtown.


Read more...

LEED for weed

News
Wednesday, January 28, 2015
012815-potcarbon-thumbBY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

What is the impact of the legal pot industry on carbon emissions? An NEBC energy forum breakfast makes the case for taking the new industry’s emissions impacts very seriously.


Read more...

Streetfight

News
Sunday, December 07, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

On Friday, Uber switched on an app — and with one push of the button torpedoed Portland’s famed public process.


Read more...

The Human Factor

February 2015
Monday, January 26, 2015
BY BRIAN LIBBY

Matt French opens up South Waterfront.


Read more...

Live, Work, Play: Amen Teter

February 2015
Tuesday, January 27, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

Catching up with Amen Teter, Portland-based global director of action sports for Octagon Olympics & Action sports talent agency.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS