Hermiston

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Wednesday, February 01, 2006
t_Hemiston

The City of Hermiston donated 6.8 acres of land for a new building that will house classrooms, labs and offices to support the further collaboration between Blue Mountain Community College and Eastern Oregon University. The new center, across the street from BMCC’s two-building campus, will support continued growth in the region and offer upper-division classes through EOU. Some money for the center, $500,000, was included as part of the 2005 federal transportation bill, and the two schools are working to finalize plans and secure the rest of the funding.

 

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