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Wednesday, March 01, 2006

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Despite rising sales, fruit retailing giant Harry and David’s bottom line weakened due in part to rising fuel costs and excess inventory. Sales for the second quarter ended Dec. 24  were up 8% for the second year in a row, but pretax income was down slightly to $81.3 million. Officials announced in February they would delay their planned initial public offering of stock.

 

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