Boardman

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Wednesday, March 01, 2006

{safe_alt_text}The poplar plantation seeded by Potlatch Forest Products Corp. along I-84 near Boardman will soon sport an on-site sawmill to manufacture hardwood lumber products from the company’s 17,000-acre high-tech plantation. The $8.1 million mill is expected to be operational by December, employing 55 people. Michael Sullivan, Potlatch spokesman, says demand for white poplar, used in cabinetry, paneling and furniture, is strong. Potlatch is also exploring other emerging markets for the wood. The mill is expected to produce 30 million board feet of Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) lumber annually

 

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