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Wednesday, March 01, 2006

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German construction and engineering giant Bilfinger Berger will move the U.S. headquarters of its civil engineering division from Longmont, Colo., to Vancouver, Wash. The office opens this month in the Columbia Tech Center development and will eventually have a staff of 50 employees. Officials at the Columbia River Economic Development Council say Bilfinger was attracted to Vancouver in part for its proximity to Lufthansa Airlines’ direct flights to Frankfurt out of Portland International Airport.

 

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