Sponsored by Lane Powell

VIP: A conversation with Eric Parsons, CEO, The Standard

| Print |  Email
Wednesday, March 01, 2006

MarchViP.jpg



"I TELL FOLKS THAT I WENT to business school in a feed store. My dad ran a feed store in Klamath Falls, and I remember one time I was in the second or third grade; it was in the afternoon and about to rain. My dad showed up at school and took me out of class. He had closed the store and taken the crew and a couple of trucks and was heading out to a farm, where one of his customers had died. The man’s hay had been cut and baled, but was still in the field and if it rained on the hay that crop was ruined. And that was the inheritance of the widow. My job was to drive the truck.  My legs were not quite long enough to reach the pedals, but by standing up and holding onto the wheel I could reach the accelerator and the brake. I learned from my dad that his customers were also his friends. His relationships lasted for 40, 50, 60 years. A lot of what I do is colored by that experience.

"How we’re celebrating our 100th anniversary is an important statement about the company. Our Days of Caring are opportunities for us to contribute something to the city.  It’s just such a Standard way of doing a celebration.

"The people who founded Standard 100 years ago founded many other important organizations in Portland. We’ve a deep history that goes way back. We can’t address every problem, but we try to be there at the right time. We try to support education and arts and folks on the street. Portland is one of the greatest cities in which to live. One of the reasons is because people take care of it. We all have a responsibility to do that."

Photo by Stuart Mullenberg

 

More Articles

6 key things to know about summer baseball in Oregon

The Latest
Friday, June 05, 2015
basedthumbBY JACOB PALMER | DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

As temperatures in Oregon creep into the 90s this weekend, Oregonians' thoughts are turning to — summer baseball.


Read more...

Cherry Raincoat

June 2015
Tuesday, May 26, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER

Spring rains are the bane of an Oregon cherry farmer’s existence. Even a few sprinkles can crack the fruit so badly it’s not worth picking. Science to the rescue: Researchers at Oregon State University have developed a spray-on film that cuts rain-related cracking in half, potentially saving a season’s crop. The coating, patented as SureSeal, is made from natural chemicals similar to those found in the skins of cherries: cellulose, palm oil-based wax and calcium.


Read more...

Photo Diary: Forest Grove Farmers Market

The Latest
Thursday, May 14, 2015
IMG 8469BY JASON E. KAPLAN | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

There are more than 160 farmers markets in Oregon, contributing an estimated $50 million in sales, according to the Oregon Farmers Markets Association. We checked in on the Forest Grove market, which for several years has brought local produce and food vendors to Main Street in the center of town.


Read more...

Stemming the tide of money in politics

Linda Baker
Wednesday, June 10, 2015
 jeff-lang-2012-thumbBY LINDA BAKER

Jeff Lang and his wife Rae used to dole out campaign checks like candy.  “We were like alcoholics,” Lang says. ”We couldn’t just give a little.”


Read more...

Destination Resorts 2.0

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER | PHOTOS BY JASON E. KAPLAN

As the recession recedes and tourism grows, Central Oregon resorts redefine themselves for a new generation.


Read more...

Change at the pump?

The Latest
Tuesday, May 26, 2015
001thumbBY JASON E. KAPLAN | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

New Jersey and Oregon are the only two states in the U.S. that ban self serve gas stations. But these two holdouts may be ready to give up the game. New Jersey is considering legislation that would lift the state's ban on pumping your own gas. Oregon is considering smaller scale changes.


Read more...

Urban renewer

Linda Baker
Wednesday, June 24, 2015
UnknownBY LINDA BAKER   

One year after he was appointed chair of the Portland Development Commission, Tom Kelly talks about PDC's longevity, Neil Kelly's comeback and his new role as Portlandia's landlord.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS