Ashland

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Saturday, April 01, 2006

{safe_alt_text}The Ashland City Council voted last month to keep its debt-mired Ashland Fiber Network but charge all but low-income households between $10 and $21 per month for its basic Internet and television services. The Council also decided to allow outside businesses to use AFN’s infrastructure to sell services to residents. The city will save money by getting out of the cable television service while staying in the money-making Internet service business. Ashland Mayor John Morrison named Joseph Franell as the new AFN director.

 

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