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Saturday, April 01, 2006

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A newsletter that celebrates local food will launch in Portland this month. Edible Communities will co-publish the title Edible Portland in partnership with the Ecotrust Food and Farms Program. It’s the first such partnership for the Ojai, Calif.-based food publisher, which has 17 other publications, such as Edible San Francisco and Edible Cape Cod. The first issue will be released on April 15,  and will be distributed for free at grocery stores, farmers markets and cooking schools.

 

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