May 2006
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1 David Chen of OVP Venture Partners: Catalyst at work
2 02/06 employment and business filing indicators
3 02/06 transportation indicators
4 02/06 real estate and construction indicators
5 02/06 farming, natural resources and energy indicators
6 More pre-K education makes good sense for business
7 Good news for the little guy
8 A bumper-sticker campaign for education
9 It's time to end Oregon’s "corporate tax dodge"
10 First person: Commentary from an Eastern Oregon farmer
11 Readers rate sources of information
12 Science: Young inventors seek to save the world
13 Taxes: a lighter burden than most states
14 Going back in time to build a business
15 Shipping: East meets East in Umatilla
16 How to foster an ethical workplace
17 Workers’ comp law: Insurance not a legal shield
18 Charitable giving: Uncovering hidden benefits
19 Statewide
20 Arlington
21 Portland
22 Portland
23 Hillsboro
24 Silverton
25 Noti
26 Grants Pass
27 Central Point
28 Ashland
29 The Coast
30 Tillamook
31 Eugene
32 Hillsboro
33 Redmond
34 Printing jobs in decline nationwide and in Oregon
35 Oregon air passenger traffic rises
36 Portland Business Alliance's 2005 Top 10 Growth Companies
37 Central Oregon's construction boom draws skilled labor away from manufacturers
38 VIP: Conversation with Cindy McEntee, CEO of Mo's restaurants on the Oregon Coast
39 Lawsuit against Blackberry highlights intellectual property risks
 

More Articles

Growing a mobility cluster

News
Friday, October 31, 2014
0414 bikes bd2f6052BY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

Why are there so few transportation startups in Portland?  The city’s leadership in bike, transit and pedestrian transportation has been well-documented.  But that was then — when government and nonprofits paved the way for a new, less auto centric way of life.


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The short list: 5 companies making a mint off kale

The Latest
Thursday, November 20, 2014
kale-thumbnailBY OB STAFF

Farmers, grocery stores and food processors cash in on kale.


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Corner Office: Timothy Mitchell

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

A look-in on the life of Norris & Stevens' president.


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The short list: Holiday habits of six Oregon CEOs

The Latest
Thursday, December 11, 2014
121214-xmaslist1BY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

We ask business and nonprofit leaders how they survive the season.


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Old school: Paulsen's Pharmacy maintains old fashion ethos

The Latest
Thursday, December 18, 2014
121914-pharmacy-thumbBY MEGHAN NOLT

VIDEO: Under the radar — complete with a soda counter, the traditional Paulsen's Pharmacy looks to compete with big box retailers.


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Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


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Corner Office: Steve Tatone

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

Seven tidbits about the president and CEO of AKT Group.


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