Redmond

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Monday, May 01, 2006

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TYM Tractors of South Korea opened a new 20,000-square-foot distribution center last month, the company’s first facility in the United States. The center will staff up to 10 employees by the end of the year and assemble tractors, which arrive by container via Seattle and Portland from South Korea, for distribution in the western United Sates and Canada. Vice president and general manager Dale Owen says Redmond was chosen for its land cost, access to highways and a skilled workforce. The facility will process 1,000 tractors, sold to hobby farmers and greenskeepers, per year.

 

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