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July 2006
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1 Laika ramps up Oregon animation industry
2 Oregon's 2006 top private 150 companies
3 2006 Private 150: ranks 1-50
4 2006 Private 150: ranks 51-100
5 2006 Private 150: ranks 101-150
6 2006 Private 150: alphabetical index and footnotes
7 In Character: Profile of Salem Stampede owner Anthony Veliz
8 A feast of creative jobs bound for Portland
9 Prices, politicians, points of view fuel energy debate
10 Two takes on pesticides
11 Beware untrained managers
12 Statewide
13 Burns
14 Boardman
15 Central Oregon
16 Redmond
17 First Person: Commentary by Michelle Neal, regional director of INROADS Inc.
18 Breakup of Clarklewis founders: a lession for family-owned ventures
19 Oregon businesspeople sound off on immigration
20 Private 150 press release
21 05/06 employment and business filing indicators
22 05/06 transportation indicators
23 05/06 real estate and construction indicators
24 05/06 farming, natural resources and energy indicators
25 Vancouver, Wash. economy bounces back
26 Lumber prices soften as housing starts slow
27 Corporate giving: Doing good is good business
28 Human resources: Preparing for elder-care issues
29 Entrepreneurship: How to tap into angel investing
30 Q&A with founder of Northwest Culinary Forum
31 New raceway planned for Morrow County
32 High-end homes get go-ahead on south coast
33 Springfield call center offers innovative space
34 Central Oregon
35 Cascade Locks
36 Clatskanie
37 Portland
38 Eugene
39 Myrtle Creek
40 Brookings
41 VIP: Conversation with Stuart Cohen, CEO of Open Source Development Lab
42 The age of negotiation
43 Portland immigration lawyer finds purpose helping families
 

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OB Poll: Wineries and groceries

News
Friday, October 24, 2014

24-winethumbA majority of respondents agreed: Local vineyards should remain Oregon-owned and quality is the most important factor when determining where to eat or buy groceries.


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Behind the curtain: What students should know about accreditation and rankings

Contributed Blogs
Thursday, December 04, 2014
120414-edurating-thumbBY DEBRA RINGOLD | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

How important are institutional and/or program evaluations provided by third parties in selecting a college or university program?


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Corner Office: Marv LaPorte

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

The president of LaPorte & Associates lets us in on his day-to-day life.


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Corner Office: Pam Edstrom

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

Seven tidbits of information from an agency partner and co-founder of Waggener Edstrom in Lake Oswego.


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Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


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Election Season

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014

We didn’t intend this issue to have an election season theme. But politics has a way of seeping into the cracks and fissures.


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Two Sides of the Coin

Contributed Blogs
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
22 twosidesBY JASON NORRIS

Historically, when the leaves fall, so do the markets. This year, earnings, Europe, energy and Ebola have in common? Beyond alliteration, they are four factors that the investors are pointing to for this year’s seasonal volatility.


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