Eugene

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Tuesday, August 01, 2006

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A high-mileage roadster powered by a compressed natural gas engine and selling for $19,900 was unveiled in Eugene in July by Eco-Fueler Corporation. The three-wheeled, three-seat hardtop convertible gets 70 miles per gallon. “If we want to get really serious about getting off of petroleum, it just seems like a logical move to compressed natural gas,” says Jerry Hendricks, acting CEO of the Bend-based company.

 

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