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Tuesday, August 01, 2006

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The shuttered Physician’s Hospital (formerly the Woodland Park Hospital) will be turned into Oregon’s first long-term care hospital. Vibra Healthcare, which is based in Pennsylvania, plans to offer approximately 80 beds for patients in need of weeks or months of high-level care. The health care company avoids state regulatory procedures by purchasing an existing hospital and resuming services within 12 months. Officials at the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems (OAHHS) plan to seek state regulatory changes that would distinguish hospitals that provide long-term care from more traditional acute-care providers. “There is no specific designation for these long-term care hospitals. It’s not fair for these hospitals to work through the same regulations as more traditional acute-care hospitals,” says OAHHS executive vice president Gwen Dayton.

 

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