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Tuesday, August 01, 2006

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Oregon Building Congress (OBC) wants to create a four-year charter high school that will focus on architecture, construction and engineering as a way to help address a workforce shortage in the construction industry. Plans call for a fall 2007 opening of classes on the campus of the Northwest College of Construction, which eventually would have 420 students splitting studies between the charter school and their current high school; students also would work with a mentor and possibly participate in paid summer internships. “We hope to bring the field into the classroom, and the classroom into the field,” says OBC executive director Richard O’Connor, who wants to replicate the model statewide.

 

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