Sponsored by Energy Trust

THE 50 HIGHEST-PAID PUBLIC COMPANY CEOs IN OREGON

| Print |  Email
Friday, September 01, 2006

{safe_alt_text}

The annual CEO pay list is researched and prepared by Watson Wyatt Worldwide.
RANK CEO, age Company Total Salary Bonus Stock award (3) No. of sec- urities under -lying options Options award All other comp- ensation $ change in total comp- ensation from 2005 (4) % change in total comp- ensation from 2005
'06
(1)
'05
(2)
1 NR William D. Perez, 57 Nike $16,504,446 $1,350,000 $1,123,358 $9,085,000 200,000 $4,701,928 $244,160 N/A N/A
2 6 Earl R. Lewis, 62 Flir Systems $12,511,449 $644,231 $650,000 $- 400,000 $11,210,218 $7,000 $9,885,564 326.70%
3 1 Mark Donegan, 49 Precision Castparts $7,541,499 $837,500 $2,071,950 $- 400,000 $4,631,349 $700 ($1,200,971) -13.10%
4 5 Richard H. Wills, 50 Tektronix $3,302,787 $623,077 $972,000 $774,250 100,000 $914,083 $19,377 ($97,627) -2.30%
5 3 Eric E. Parsons, 57 StanCorp Financial Group $3,225,926 $725,000 $722,644 $1,054,560 80,000 $631,325 $92,397 ($1,588,090) -27.40%
6 NR Gerald K. Perkel, 50 Planar Systems $2,649,943 $430,000 $- $1,256,000 240,000 $963,443 $500 N/A N/A
7 14 James E. Declusin, 63 Oregon Steel Mills $2,500,999 $557,500 $706,796 $623,861 -- $538,915 $73,927 $452,109 22.10%
8 35 Raymond P. Davis, 56 Umpqua Holdings $2,220,485 $608,000 $513,000 $- 75,000 $503,562 $595,923 $1,532,724 200.90%
9 15 Scott C. Grout, 43 Radisys $2,020,795 $404,551 $160,000 $607,050 100,000 $841,634 $7,560 $707,712 36.50%
10 22 Robert C. Warren Jr., 57 Cascade $1,986,074 $430,000 $644,000 $- 75,000 $879,481 $32,593 $445,994 27.60%
11 NR Stephen A. Skaggs, 43 Lattice Semiconductor $1,954,928 $356,905 $127,500 $- 650,000 $1,464,777 $5,746 N/A N/A
12 33 Chester L.F. Paulson, 70 Paulson Capital $1,953,480 $1,463,567 $40,000 $- -- $- $449,913 $1,107,584 130.90%
13 25 William A. Furman, 61 Greenbrier Companies $1,782,500 $550,000 $825,000 $- -- $- $407,500 $269,580 17.80%
14 NR John D. Carter, 59 Schnitzer Steel Industries $1,729,822 $600,000 $- $- 92,000 $1,125,530 $4,292 N/A N/A
15 24 Sidney B. DeBoer, 62 Lithia Motors $1,671,100 $710,000 $785,450 $- 20,001 $149,379 $26,271 $116,617 7.40%
16 2 Nicholas Konidaris, 61 Electro Scientific Industries $1,599,849 $395,000 $300,000 $342,280 40,000 $524,611 $37,958 ($7,088,359) -78.50%
17 16 Walden C. Rhines, 59 Mentor Graphics $1,592,697 $595,298 $- $- 200,000 $991,099 $6,300 ($99,413) -5.30%
18 23 Bruce Davis, 53 Digimarc $1,515,708 $410,000 $120,000 $870,000 25,000 $115,708 $- $695,240 43.50%
19 27 Mark S. Dodson, 61 Northwest Natural Gas $1,481,486 $489,167 $300,000 $332,800 -- $287,485 $72,034 $123,350 9.10%
20 34 Patricia L. Moss, 52 Cascade Bancorp $1,407,555 $308,420 $370,104 $231,000 -- $199,546 $298,485 $585,307 71.20%
21 8 Vahe A. Sarkissian, 63 FEI $1,238,642 $530,000 $- $- 82,500 $703,743 $4,899 ($1,487,933) -53.00%
22 12 James S. Osterman, 68 Blount International $1,228,630 $540,383 $550,000 $- -- $- $138,247 ($1,008,718) -45.10%
23 NR Jerry A. Dukes, 58 PW Eagle $1,123,148 $270,000 $212,375 $- 40,000 $628,181 $12,592 N/A N/A
24 32 Robert D. Sznewajs, 59 West Coast Bancorp $1,061,730 $330,000 $330,000 $256,968 29,100 $136,871 $7,891 $402,493 44.20%
25 18 Kay L. Toolson, 62 Monaco Coach $988,558 $850,000 $- $- 15,000 $107,273 $31,285 ($757,785) -43.00%
RANK CEO, age Company Total Salary Bonus Stock award (3) No. of sec- urities under -lying options Options award All other comp- ensation $ change in total comp- ensation from 2005 (4) % change in total comp- ensation from 2005
'06
(1)
'05
(2)
26 19 Kenneth L. Tepper, 46 TRM $969,494 $475,008 $409,057 $41,910 -- $36,203 $7,316 ($703,940) -42.10%
27 17 Allen H. Alley, 51 Pixelworks $939,142 $306,346 $38,350 $- 100,000 $594,446 $- ($846,196) -44.90%
28 28 Michael Flannery, 62 Pope & Talbot $930,349 $569,409 $- $215,460 24,500 $139,180 $6,300 ($121,821) -9.60%
29 29 Kyle C. Ranson, 44 Infocus $851,476 $511,593 $6,000 $21,050 100,000 $308,714 $4,119 ($270,681) -24.10%
30 30 Brian W. Dunham, 48 Northwest Pipe $848,918 $495,000 $310,561 $- -- $- $43,357 ($232,545) -21.50%
31 38 John L. Anhorn, 63 Premierwest Bancorp $831,548 $250,000 $125,000 $- 13,230 $46,311 $410,237 $322,674 61.80%
32 NR Denis R. Burger, 62 AVI Biopharma $754,850 $350,000 $120,000 $- 175,000 $276,450 $8,400 N/A N/A
33 36 Paul A. Rosenbaum, 63 Rentrak $752,747 $450,000 $- $- 75,000 $301,247 $1,500 $116,874 16.40%
34 20 Timothy P. Boyle, 56 Columbia Sportswear $739,824 $720,000 $- $- -- $- $19,824 ($910,936) -55.20%
35 43 Roger L. Christensen, 48 Columbia Bancorp $717,257 $208,333 $219,949 $43,700 11,000 $61,992 $183,283 $364,210 90.60%
36 50 Ralph G. Quinsey, 50 Triquint Semiconductor $645,707 $329,293 $398 $- 150,000 $316,016 $- $468,064 142.90%
37 39 Saed Mohseni, 43 Mccormick & Schmicks Seafood Restaurants $637,423 $303,846 $322,500 $- -- $- $11,077 $129,195 25.40%
38 40 Mark R. Hollinger, 47 Merix $620,018 $330,000 $- $46,100 39,450 $234,915 $9,003 $223,019 46.80%
39 31 Joseph P. Schneider, 46 Lacrosse Footwear $613,095 $373,462 $110,246 $- 20,000 $113,790 $15,597 ($343,902) -35.20%
40 NR Andrew A. Wiederhorn, 40 Fog Cutter Capital Group $589,488 $96,579 $492,909 $- -- $- $- N/A N/A
41 21 Salvatore D’Auria, 50 Tut Systems $450,000 $325,000 $125,000 $- -- $- $- ($1,186,739) -72.50%
42 47 Alex P. Hart, 43 Corillian $399,484 $280,000 $115,500 $- -- $- $3,984 $20,576 5.40%
43 45 Hal M. Brown, 52 Pacific Continental $364,727 $215,490 $118,800 $- -- $- $30,437 ($19,371) -5.00%
44 48 Eric W. Strid, 53 Cascade Microtech $292,190 $205,423 $84,013 $- -- $- $2,754 ($80,111) -21.50%
45 NR Rodney M. Boucher, 62 Microfield Group $290,000 $290,000 $- $- -- $- $- N/A N/A
46 49 Patrick P.H. Sireta, 61 Advanced Power Technology $265,436 $211,412 $53,769 $- -- $- $255 ($74,635) -21.90%
47 NR Sreeni’ M. Sreenivasan, 57 Synthetech $254,411 $204,000 $- $- 30,000 $33,901 $16,510 N/A N/A
48 44 William V. Humphreys Sr., 58 Citizens Bancorp $252,240 $202,240 $50,000 $- -- $- $- ($147,893) -37.00%
49 NR James M. Usdan, 56 Metro One Telecommunications $206,113 $170,000 $- $- 150,000 $36,113 $- N/A N/A
50 NR James W. Bernau, 52 Willamette Valley Vineyards $203,143 $158,658 $37,500 $- -- $- $6,985 N/A N/A


Footnotes:

(1) 2006 rankings, based on 2005 proxy statements, were calculated using “total direct compensation,” equal to: base salary + bonus + other cash compensation + restricted stock + dollar value of LTIP target + Black-Scholes values of option grants. Stock awards include restricted stock and performance share grants during the year calculated as the number of shares granted multiplied by the price at grant, if reported, or the price at year-end. Stock options are valued using a Black-Scholes methodology.

(2) 2005 rankings were calculated using the same methodology as the 2006 rankings, except that there was a 10% discount applied to the time-restricted stock values in 2005. This affected six companies in our list and the impacts were minimal and did not change the 2005 rankings.

(3) Consisting of restricted stock awards, or LTIP payouts in stock.

(4) This value is calculated for incumbents only. Data provided to Watson Wyatt by Equilar Inc.

 

More Articles

Corner Office: Timothy Mitchell

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

A look-in on the life of Norris & Stevens' president.


Read more...

Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


Read more...

The short list: 4 companies engaged in a battle of the paddles

The Latest
Thursday, December 04, 2014
pingpongthumbBY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Nothing says startup culture like a ping pong table in the office, lounge or lobby.


Read more...

Behind the curtain: What students should know about accreditation and rankings

Contributed Blogs
Thursday, December 04, 2014
120414-edurating-thumbBY DEBRA RINGOLD | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

How important are institutional and/or program evaluations provided by third parties in selecting a college or university program?


Read more...

Woman of Steel

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

Tamara Lundgren tackles the challenges—without getting trampled.


Read more...

See How They Run

January-Powerbook 2015
Friday, December 12, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

Studying ground-running birds, a group that ranks among nature's speediest and most agile bipedal runners, to build a faster robot.


Read more...

Dan and Louis Oyster Bar opens up to a changing neighborhood

The Latest
Thursday, December 11, 2014
121114-oystervidBy MEGHAN NOLT

VIDEO: Revamping a Classic — an iconic eatery stays relevant in a changing marketplace.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS