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Portland

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Sunday, October 01, 2006

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Almost 2,000 white-collar workers at Freightliner were offered voluntary buyouts. The company, owned by DaimlerChrysler, is cutting jobs because of decreased demand for the heavy-duty trucks it produces in Portland. The smaller number of orders is due in part to new federal emissions standards for 2007 that  would increase production costs by 10% within the next year. Freightliner will still make larger rigs for construction and logging operations along with military trucks. Currently, the company produces about 74 trucks per day.

 

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