Government should stay out of the health care arena

| Print |  Email
Sunday, October 01, 2006


I have just finished reading KITZHABER’S CURE. We all realize that Oregon and the United States in general have not fully come to grips with our health care dilemma. There are many ideas floating around — all the way from socialized medicine to free-market medicine.  And, there appears to be no consensus on the issue.

I do have a few observations that were not clearly defined in your article:

If employers were no longer able to offer health care plans and provided additional compensation so that employees could purchase their own medical plans, that could be a step in the right direction.  It also would be helpful if employers and employees were encouraged to use catastrophic coverage plans rather than plans that cover everything. Along with that, employers and employees could be encouraged to take advantage of medical savings account plans.

If government got out of the business of dictating coverage, more people could afford to purchase policies. (Every time another coverage is mandated, the cost of these policies increases, making them less affordable to lower-income families.) There will always be a number of people who do not want to pay for coverage. That is their right. But it is not their right to be subsidized by others. This primarily refers to younger workers who, for the most part, do not encounter major health problems. If government is to subsidize medical care for the truly poor, community health clinics would appear to be the most cost-effective way of meeting their routine needs (including preventive medicine services).

So, where do we go from here?  I don’t know. But we will be better off the further we move away from government-mandated programs and the closer we move to a free-market economy for health care.

Don McDaniel
Astoria


Have an opinion? E-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

More Articles

Powerbook Perspective

January-Powerbook 2015
Friday, December 12, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

A conversation with Oregon state economist Josh Lehner.


Read more...

The short list: Holiday habits of six Oregon CEOs

The Latest
Thursday, December 11, 2014
121214-xmaslist1BY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

We ask business and nonprofit leaders how they survive the season.


Read more...

Free Falling

Contributed Blogs
Thursday, December 18, 2014
121714-oilprice-thumbBY JASON NORRIS | OB CONTRIBUTOR

The implosion of the energy complex: The best thing for low oil prices is low oil prices.


Read more...

Corner Office: Pam Edstrom

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

Seven tidbits of information from an agency partner and co-founder of Waggener Edstrom in Lake Oswego.


Read more...

Dan and Louis Oyster Bar opens up to a changing neighborhood

The Latest
Thursday, December 11, 2014
121114-oystervidBy MEGHAN NOLT

VIDEO: Revamping a Classic — an iconic eatery stays relevant in a changing marketplace.


Read more...

The short list: 4 companies engaged in a battle of the paddles

The Latest
Thursday, December 04, 2014
pingpongthumbBY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Nothing says startup culture like a ping pong table in the office, lounge or lobby.


Read more...

Top stories in 2014

The Latest
Thursday, December 18, 2014
10-listthumb

2014 was a year of wild contradictions, fast-paced growth and unexpected revelations.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS