Umatilla

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Sunday, October 01, 2006

 

umatilla.jpg

The Wildhorse Resort and Casino, owned by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, continues to expand: It will add a sports bar, cabaret, 140 slot machines and an upscale restaurant expected to open in April. Visitor numbers are up over 600,000 people a year, and casino management is now trying to target more travelers from Seattle and Portland. “Our main business is gambling, but with new food and beverage facilities we expect those businesses will grow,” says casino spokesman Charles Denight. “Our goal over the long term is to turn this into a destination resort.” The expansion will include 100 new jobs.

 

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