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Wednesday, November 01, 2006

The Dry Creek Landfill will begin producing methane gas in the spring. Dry Creek already produces methane, a natural byproduct of landfills. “Currently, we’re just wasting that resource,” says landfill general manager Lee Fortier, explaining that the gas is burned off through a flaring system. Once the two 20-cylinder internal combustion engines go online in May, Dry Creek will convert methane into 3.2 megawatts of electricity, enough to power 3,000 homes per year, with the potential for future growth. The 230-acre landfill, Jackson County’s largest, handles about 900 tons of garbage a day.

 

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