Roseburg

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Wednesday, November 01, 2006

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Roseburg Forest Products continued its drive to be one of the nation’s leading producers of wood panels with its purchase of six mills in the southeastern United States. The mills, owned by Georgia Pacific, make particleboard and related melamine and cut-to-size panels, and serve everyone from furniture makers to home stores. Roseburg CEO Allyn Ford says that most of the 750 employees at the mills in Mississippi, Georgia and South Carolina will be rehired as part of the ownership change. The mills will be the first outside the Northwest for Roseburg. G-P was bought last year by Koch Industries and is based in Atlanta.

 

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