Rickreall

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Wednesday, November 01, 2006

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By April 2007, about 500 homes in the Willamette Valley will be powered by manure from the Rickreall Dairy. Cow manure will be converted into methane gas, compost and peat moss with a “digester program” jointly run by dairy co-owners Gus Wybenga and Louie Kazemir and Real Energy, an alternative energy systems provider in Napa, Calif. The $4 million project, supplemented by about $2.5 million from Energy Trust, has been in progress for the last five years. “I was always intrigued with the idea,” Kazemir says.

 

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