Semantics and St. Clair

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Wednesday, November 01, 2006

I noticed that your profile of Jeffrey St. Clair [IN CHARACTER, October] refers to The Nation as a “‘zine.” My, such a trendy label you assign to a journal continuously in print since 1865.

Perhaps a more honest and less distorted editorial policy on your part may assist Oregon Business with such a lengthy run of readership. Or you could simply please your current list of corporate ad clients and misrepresent reality. Let’s see how far that goes.

Scott Chesal
Portland

 

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