Uncollected taxes don’t cost the state

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Wednesday, November 01, 2006


Have you gone completely off the deep end? To suggest that it costs the state when they don’t collect taxes, when voters pass initiatives limiting government [WHEN BALLOTS BREAK THE BANK, October], is so blatantly liberal that I’m just going to have to agree with Michael Savage that you have a mental disorder.

Let’s just look at some more “facts” using your reasoning: Please calculate how much it costs the state not to raise the gas tax 15 cents a gallon. Add to that how much it costs the state not to collect tolls on our highways. Add to that how much it costs the state not to have a sales tax of 6%. Add to that how much it costs the state not to increase the income tax to 11%. Add to that the costs of not collecting taxes on a whole host of possibilities and you can quickly see that the state should just surrender to France right now.

Your highlight, of course, is the phrase “taking money out of state government’s coffers via initiative.” Here the fundamental divide in reasoning and policy-making reveals your true colors, that by not collecting taxes we are somehow taking money from government. Amazing. Whatever happened to the thought that government serves the people? Whatever happened to the reasoning that government should learn to live on what it gets, like the rest of us?

And the really sad thing is that this article comes from Oregon Business. I would expect it from Willamette Week or the Oregonian, but not a publication that supposedly wants to improve the business climate in a state woefully behind in attracting tax-paying, revenue-building businesses. I think you’ve caught the “entitlement bug” and you should get some antibiotics quickly.

Skip Heiney
Banks

 

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