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Friday, December 01, 2006

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After a year of competitive bidding, USIA was awarded an $8 million contract by the U.S. Coast Guard to manufacture lightweight dry suits. The company will produce about 12,000 dry suits during the next five years. Kimberly Johns, president of USIA, says the effects of the contract on the company will be more than an increase in employees, including an increase in visibility among other law-enforcement groups. USIA specializes in waterproof, breathable dry suits.

 

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