Klamath Falls

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Friday, December 01, 2006

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A new biodiesel rendering facility got off the ground in Klamath Falls last month. Green Fuels of Oregon is converting canola oil to biodiesel and feed for dairy cows. The plant will use geothermal-heated water for the production process and to heat the greenhouses for a sister company, Fresh Green Organic Gardens, next door. “I don’t know which is the side business, the greenhouses or the biodiesel,” says Rick Walsh, operations officer for both companies. The greenhouses will grow tomatoes, cucumbers and the greens for salad mixes, while the plant will produce about 1 million gallons of biodiesel annually. Each business will employ about 10 people.

 

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