COOS BAY

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Monday, January 01, 2007

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After a quibble over price, the crab season launched in December with fishermen commanding $1.60 per pound for crab meat and battling winter storms to land their catch. Hugh Link, interim administrator for the Oregon Dungeness Crab Commission, says early catches were bringing in exceptionally sweet meat. “The crabs are full and plump and ready to go,” he says. Despite a late January start to the season last year, Oregon crabbers brought in 27.5 million pounds of crab meat in 2006, the second-largest catch on record after 2005’s 33 million pounds.

 

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