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Monday, January 01, 2007

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A growing all-terrain vehicle manufacturing company has injected tiny Nyssa — just south of Ontario — with new economic life. Driving Ambitions is scheduled to build 1,000 ATVs this year based on designs from Pacer International. The company expected 17 employees by Jan. 1 and it’ll eventually ramp up to 50 or 60. It has taken over the old Wilson’s market building in central Nyssa. Company manager Ted Iverson says Driving Ambitions will eventually build a new manufacturing facility in town as it outgrows its current spot and hires more people. “There were so many unemployed and underemployed people around town — it is such a waste,” Iverson says.

 

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