RICHLAND, WASH

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Thursday, February 01, 2007

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The U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory solidified a deal with Apollo Sensor Technology and scientists at Russia’s Karpov Institute of Physical Chemistry in Moscow to market a hydrogen gas sensor. Russian scientists developed a new approach, using nanoscale materials in the sensor, designed to detect hydrogen leaks. According to Geoffrey Harvey from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the new sensor fits in the palm of a hand, detects the smallest of leaks and has an almost immediate response time. “A sensor that does all that ours does is up in the $1,500-$3,000 range,” says Dan Briscoe, vice president of Kennewick, Wash.-based Apollo Sensor Technology. This sensor will be marketed for around $200. It is intended for use in chemical processing plants and refineries, motor vehicles and in hydrogen fuel cells used as backup power generators.

 

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