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CENTRAL POINT

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Thursday, March 01, 2007

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There’s a hay shortage in Oregon. According to Jerry May from the Grange Co-Op, Oregon growers shipped large quantities of hay to California after water regulations forced California growers to reduce the amount of hay they produced, applying direct pressure to the hay supply in Oregon. Oregonians are getting hay wherever they can, be it the Klamath Basin or Idaho. Prices rose as well, from $125 per ton in 2006 to as much as $175 this year. May says that finding enough available water is rapidly becoming an issue for hay farmers. Some growers are also planting former hay fields with corn, tempted by the corn demand fueled by an increase in ethanol plants around the country.


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