MEDFORD

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Thursday, March 01, 2007

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One-stop shopping just took on a whole new meaning. Lithia Motors began construction on The Rogue Valley Auto Mall, the largest auto mall in the state, in January. By this summer, the first of seven Lithia dealerships will move in and begin selling cars. The auto mall is expected to have a $50 million price tag  and nine different car manufacturers with an inventory of thousands of cars on its 60-acre lot. Lithia sells cars in 15 states as well as online. 


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