LEBANON

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Thursday, March 01, 2007

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About 70 Weyerhaeuser employees will be looking for new jobs when the Bauman sawmill closes. Citing pressure from the marketplace and a decrease in the availability of large Douglas fir trees, which the mill processes, the company announced the closure of the sawmill in February. The planer, with 50 employees, will remain open. The Bauman mill was built in the 1940s.


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