Home Archives March 2007 Q&A with Shauna Alexander Mohr, co-founder of fair-trade jewelry store, Lucina

Q&A with Shauna Alexander Mohr, co-founder of fair-trade jewelry store, Lucina

| Print |  Email
Thursday, March 01, 2007
ShaunaMohr.jpg

Photo by Charles Gullung

 

PORTLAND — Shauna Alexander Mohr, president and co-founder of Lucina, an online fair-trade jewelry company, believes consumers should know the history of each product they purchase. You won’t find any so-called conflict stones in Lucina’s collections, nor will designers scratch their heads when asked about the origins of jewelry components. Instead, the year-old company focuses on telling the stories behind the products.


How did you get into the jewelry business?
My background is in strategy consulting and economic development. I spent a lot of time working with co-operatives of coffee producers throughout Central and South America who were operating under fair-trade certification. I saw the difference that made for them on the ground, and I saw the burgeoning market here in the U.S., how people really responded to it. So I started looking around for a new business in which nothing was really happening yet and jewelry emerged as the one.

Where did Lucina come from?
Lucina is the Roman goddess who quite literally brought children “into the light of the world.” It worked on all the fronts I was looking for.  It was a beautiful word and its meaning evoked our mission in many different ways: illuminate, inspire and indulge.

Is there an advantage in being from Oregon?
It’s more predictable to be from somewhere else. But maybe in three years the most predictable thing will be that if you’re a socially conscious fashion company, people will assume you’re from Portland. I think that the community is receptive.

Do you think you will continue to be an online store with a few boutiques carrying your line, or will you open a Lucina store?
We’ll definitely keep the online store and we’ll just further distinguish what we carry online from what’s in the wholesale line.

Do you see an awareness of sustainability increasing in the next few years?
I think that’s part of the awakening that’s happening in jewelry, particularly when you look at precious metals, gemstones and diamond mining.

As awareness grows I think people will demand more of it.  I think that what shows up first for people is the human element because of movies like Blood Diamond.

Will Blood Diamond raise more awareness?
It already has. It spurs a lot of people to ask a lot of questions. That is where I see Lucina’s role. We do want to shed light on the origins of our products but we [also] want to be shedding light on the alternatives.

If you can make a choice that makes you feel really good about what you bought because you know it has an impact, then you’ve generated something that people respond to.

Then there’s energy behind it. Provide something for people to act on, provide something for people to be inspired by.

— Colleen Moran


Have an opinion? E-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

 

More Articles

OB Poll: Wineries and groceries

News
Friday, October 24, 2014

24-winethumbA majority of respondents agreed: Local vineyards should remain Oregon-owned and quality is the most important factor when determining where to eat or buy groceries.


Read more...

What I'm Reading

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Peter Lizotte at ACME Business Solutions and Roger Busse at Pacific Continental Bank share their favorite reads.


Read more...

Grape Expectations

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
BY HANNAH WALLACE

Well-financed outsiders from France and California are buying up vineyards and wineries in the Willamette Valley.


Read more...

100 Best Nonprofits to Work for in Oregon [VIDEO]

News
Thursday, October 02, 2014

Screen shot 2014-10-02 at 11.17.21 AMMore than 5,500 employees from 180 organizations throughout the state participated in the 100 Best Nonprofits to Work for in Oregon project.


Read more...

Books Rule

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
BY JON BELL

Powell's stays relevant in the digital age.


Read more...

Fork & Bottle

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014

National media can’t get enough of Oregon’s pinot noir, artisan-food purveyors and lively, independent film scene.


Read more...

A Complex Portrait: Immigration, Jobs and the Economy

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY JOE ROJAS-BURKE & KIM MOORE

Oregon Business reports on the visa squeeze, the skills gap and foreign-born residents who are revitalizing rural Oregon.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS