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LINCOLN CITY

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Sunday, April 01, 2007
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LINCOLN CITY — It’s a classic conundrum for coastal towns: What can you offer visitors on a rainy day? Sandy Pfaff, director of the Lincoln City Visitor & Convention Bureau, is trying culinary tourism. On March 2, the doors opened to the new Culinary Center, located in a previously unused facility owned by the city. Local chef Rob Pounding, owner and operator of R&R Hospitality, is the first in what Pfaff hopes will become a long line of teachers at the center. One of their first workshops will be a series about Pacific Northwest seafood. The center can accommodate about 25 people for a class and 125 for a meeting. This is the third culinary center on the Coast, joining the Duncan Law Seafood Consumer Center in Astoria and the accredited Oregon Coast Culinary Institute in Coos Bay.

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