Home Archives April 2007 Tips for an effective power breakfast

Tips for an effective power breakfast

| Print |  Email
Sunday, April 01, 2007

breakfast00407.jpgBacon, eggs and doing business

In a less enlightened time, doing business over breakfast warranted a serious title: the power breakfast. But these days, the socially savvy have pushed “power” aside for a softer, kinder and more intimate start-the-day meeting — sans buffets, spreadsheets or late arrivals at the office.

10 tips for a successful breakfast meeting

1. RESEARCH THE LOCATION in advance to avoid unexpected surprises. Compile a short list of great, reliable breakfast places, with at least one per neighborhood.

2. BE EARLY. This is not the time to bounce in a few minutes late. Being a few minutes early sets a more relaxed tone for the meeting.

3. KEEP IT SIMPLE. This is not the time to get a side of fruit and pancakes and yogurt and toast. This should not be a multi-course, complicated affair like dinner.

4. ORDER DISHES THAT AREN’T MESSY. Avoid drippy, mushy dishes that require too much attention and opt for something manageable, so you can easily eat and talk at the same time.

5. LEAVE THE PRINTED AGENDA AT THE OFFICE. Usually breakfast tables are filled with butter, syrup, coffees, juices, waters, etc., so there’s no real space for printed materials.

6. TAKE A QUICK LOOK at the newspaper before you head to breakfast. It’s nice to ease in to the meeting with a quick conversation about the day’s current events.

7. BEWARE OF THE ETERNAL FOUNTAIN OF COFFEE. To avoid jitters, allow one or maybe two cups to be poured while you’re dining, but stop the flow after that and switch to water.

8. FOCUS ON BRAINSTORMING OR JUMPSTARTING new projects. The beginning of the day is a great metaphor for beginning strategic partnerships or introducing people.

9. TRY NETWORKING. Because breakfast meetings can fall outside the daily routine, they’re a great time to keep building relationships that don’t fit into the work day.

10. LIMIT THE MEETING TO AN HOUR. People need to get their day started. Meeting for longer than an hour creates a hurdle for the rest of the morning.

“Breakfast meetings are a bit more casual than lunch meetings,” says Sheri Fitts, director of communication and large plan sales for the Standard Retirement Plan Group. “Everyone’s just kind of waking up.”

In the business world, waking up offers an excuse for informal networking, which Fitts finds inspirational. She often gets together with those outside her field over breakfast, not only because busy schedules can usually accommodate a meeting first thing, but because the time slot seems like psychological free space — a time for creative thinking without an agenda. Fitts recommends scheduling these breakfasts for just 45 minutes.

Lisa Donoughe, owner of LAD communications, relishes the breakfast meeting for what it can inspire. “I love the change of atmosphere,” she says. “There’s something fresh about being outside the conference room.”

But that clean slate hinges on choosing the right location. Donoughe prefers the Bijou Cafe in Portland, a who’s-who spot in the morning, both for the ambience and one of her favorite breakfast meeting dishes, a healthy quesadilla that’s easily shared. A few blocks away at the Heathman Restaurant, meetings start happening right at 7 a.m., when the doors open, says the general manager Garrett Peck, who touts the Heathman’s reliable comfort foods and free Wi-Fi.

In Eugene, lawyers and judges frequent the Zenon Café in the morning, thanks to its proximity to the courthouse, while in Salem, legislators and lobbyists can be found discussing the day’s most contentious legislation over coffee in the Café Today,  inside the Capitol.

But no matter where people choose to exchange ideas before the start of the workday, the most successful encounters recognize the uniqueness of a morning meeting. “When you ask people to start their day with you,” Fitts says, “they deserve more than the common courtesies.”

— Lucy Burningham


Have an opinion? E-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

More Articles

Wheel man

March 2014
Tuesday, February 25, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

Les Schwab has put a premium on customer service since 1952, when legendary namesake Les Schwab founded the company with one store in Prineville. (Schwab died in 2007.) But if the corporate principles remain essentially the same, the world around this iconic Oregon business has changed dramatically.


Read more...

How to help your staff solve their own problems

Contributed Blogs
Friday, March 21, 2014
03.21.14 thumb coxcoffeeTOM COX | OB BLOGGER

During a recent talk to HR Directors, I asked if they saw leaders trying to solve every problem, instead of delegating to and empowering staff. Every head nodded. Every single one.


Read more...

How to boost web traffic

News
Thursday, April 10, 2014
BY JESSICA RIDGWAY  | OB WEB EDITOR

04.10.14 thumb seo-trafficSEMpdx hosted a workshop this week for entrepreneurs, website developers and others interested in search engine optimization (SEO).  Here are a few tips and tricks aimed at bumping up your search engine rankings.


Read more...

The 2014 100 Best Companies to Work for in Oregon

News
Friday, February 28, 2014

100best14logo ThumbnailThe 21st annual 100 Best Companies to Work For in Oregon list was announced Thursday night at an awards dinner at the Oregon Convention Center.


Read more...

What I'm reading: Brad Smith & Travis Boersma

March 2014
Tuesday, February 25, 2014

Brad Smith, founder of Hot Pepper Studios, and Travis Boersma, president of Dutch Bros. Coffee, share their recent reads.


Read more...

100 Best Companies to Work for in Oregon [VIDEO]

News
Monday, March 03, 2014

Screen shot 2014-03-03 at 11.26.47 AM

Check out interviews with employees from some of the 100 Best Companies to Work For in Oregon winners and find out what makes their company a great place to work.


Read more...

Branching out

March 2014
Tuesday, February 25, 2014
DSC04185BY LINDA BAKER

A blueberry bush is a blueberry bush — except when it’s a blueberry tree.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS