CULVER

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Sunday, April 01, 2007
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CULVER — After more than 30 years manufacturing saltwater fishing boats, Seaswirl Boats will close by the end of the month. The city’s largest employer will lay off about 170 people. Roger R. Cloutier II, president and chief operating officer of Minneapolis-based parent company Genmar Holdings, calls the closure a cost-effective move. While production of Seaswirl boats will move to Little Falls, Minn., after the closure, most of Seaswirl’s administrative functions moved to Genmar’s Sarasota, Fla., facilities several months ago. Genmar will offer some Seaswirl employees the opportunity to relocate to another one of its facilities. Culver Mayor Daniel Harden is one of the affected employees. He worked at Seaswirl for 26 years until he was laid off in November as part of the closure.


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