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May 2007
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# Article Title
1 The Transformers
2 Our own corps of discovery
3 Readers concerned about loss of family-wage jobs
4 LNG terminals ignite a statewide controversy
5 The Dalles makes a comeback
6 In Character: Profile of Ziba Design's founder Sohrab Vossoughi
7 VIP: Conversation with Mary Cullinan, President of SOU
8 Deal Watch: Powerhouse investor dips into Portland — then flips
9 Capitol Gains: What’s waiting in the wings?
10 Portland Business Alliance’s Top 10 Growth Awards 2006
11 ENTERPRISE
12 HR in summer: sun, fun and workplace headaches
13 Philanthropy: A Web of support
14 BOARDMAN
15 THE DALLES
16 MADRAS
17 REDMOND
18 BEND
19 PORTLAND
20 MCMINNVILLE
21 SALEM
22 CORVALLIS
23 MEDFORD
24 BROOKINGS
25 Callahan's Lodge near Ashland is phoenix in the making
26 February '07 employment and business filing indicators...
27 February '07 transportation indicators
28 February '07 real estate and construction indicators
29 February '07 farming, natural resources and energy indicators
30 Labor union representation ebbs
31 Regional home sales stumble
32 Northwest's mortgage delinquency trails rest of nation
33 Salmon season brings hope to Oregon’s southern fleet
34 Oregon's first IKEA store opens this summer
35 Q&A with Kedma Ough of Micro-Inventors Program of Oregon
36 Oregon Riesling wine rises in popularity
37 Jacksonville debates reopening historic mine
38 Source for new artesian water business found in Eastern Oregon
39 OSU engineers design popular "WavyWand"
40 Bonneville Dam's bridge swings easier with new bearings
41 Workforce training: Double value of internships
 

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Behind the curtain: What students should know about accreditation and rankings

Contributed Blogs
Thursday, December 04, 2014
120414-edurating-thumbBY DEBRA RINGOLD | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

How important are institutional and/or program evaluations provided by third parties in selecting a college or university program?


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Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


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Tackling the CEO-worker pay gap

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014
BY OREGON BUSINESS STAFF

An SEC rule targets the disparity between executive and employee compensation, reigniting a long-standing debate about corporate social responsibility.


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Corner Office: Steve Tatone

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

Seven tidbits about the president and CEO of AKT Group.


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Top 10 stories of 2014

The Latest
Thursday, December 18, 2014
10-listthumbBY LINDA BAKER

2014 was a year of wild contradictions, fast-paced growth and unexpected revelations.


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Political Clout

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY KIM MOORE

Businesses spend billions of dollars each year trying to influence political decision makers by piling money into campaigns.


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Fly Zone

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY JOE ROJAS-BURKE

The black soldier fly’s larvae are among the most ravenous and least picky eaters on earth.


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