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Philanthropy: A Web of support

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Tuesday, May 01, 2007
Often, a significant barrier to business giving is not the willingness to give, but the lack of know-how about how to be an effective giver. Today, thanks to the Internet, a vast array of resources is available to help Oregon businesses learn more about their corporate philanthropy options and then set up and operate a charitable giving program.

  • Social Venture Partners (www.svpportland.org): SVPP’s mission is based on pursuing philanthropy using a unique model that borrows from successful venture capital practices. It connects its partners directly with investees. SVPP not only educates individuals to be well-informed and effective philanthropists but also engages them through volunteering opportunities and financial investment.

  • Northwest Business for Culture and the Arts (www.nwbca.org): The mission of NW/BCA is to increase public and private support for arts, heritage and humanities in Oregon and southwest Washington. The site explains ways for businesses to become involved and provides links to information about arts in the community, including the economic impact of the arts.

  • Employers for Education Excellence (www.e3oregon.org): E3 is a statewide nonprofit organization working with employers and schools to boost student achievement. The site is designed to provide employers and other key stakeholders with information about improving schools in Oregon and the resources to get involved.

  • The Oregon Community Foundation (www.OCF1.org): OCF administers philanthropic giving programs for individuals and businesses throughout Oregon. OCF publishes a free guide to business giving, Oregon Business Giving Workbook, which can be ordered online.

  • Entrepreneurs Foundation of the Northwest (www.efnw.org): EFNW seeks to make Oregon and southwest Washington a better place to live and work by directing the energy, wealth and innovation of early-stage growth companies to build stronger communities. Furthering corporate citizenship, EFNW also helps organize community service projects to create employee giving and volunteer programs.

  • Guidestar (www.guidestar.org): Guidestar focuses on facilitating access to information about the operations and finances of nonprofit organizations. It’s best known for providing access to the IRS 990 forms of nonprofit organizations, and also includes information provided by nonprofits about their programs.

— Greg Chaillé, president
Oregon Community Foundation

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