SEASIDE

| Print |  Email
Friday, June 01, 2007

{safe_alt_text}

When customers request something at Jackson and Son, a commercial fuel supplier on the north coast, Larry Jackson listens. His customers wanted biodiesel, so he secured a supply that incorporates Oregon-grown canola. Jackson says one group of customers wants to be environmentally conscious, while another segment wants to keep fuel dollars in the U.S., supporting the local economy and farmers. Although biodiesel costs about 10 cents per gallon more than conventional diesel, “we looked at it as a start.” With so much in the news about municipalities and companies going green, Jackson wants to spread the message that anyone can use the B20 biodiesel he sells at his Seaside, Astoria and Garibaldi pumps.

Have an opinion? E-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

More Articles

Startup or Grow Up?

September 2014
Tuesday, August 26, 2014
BY JON BELL

Startup culture is all the rage. Is there a downside?


Read more...

Measure 91: What Oregon Businesses Need to Know

Contributed Blogs
Wednesday, October 15, 2014
91 thumbBY DIANE BUISMAN

Some common misconceptions employers have about marijuana.


Read more...

October surprise

News
Sunday, October 12, 2014
roundup-logo-thumb-14BY LINDA BAKER

Cylvia Hayes, tabloid vs. watchdog journalism and the looming threat of a Cascadia earthquake.


Read more...

A Good Leap Forward

September 2014
Wednesday, August 27, 2014
BY AMY MILSHTEIN

Agriculture businesses ramp up to meet international demand as workforce and succession challenges loom.


Read more...

Fast Food Slows Down

September 2014
Tuesday, August 26, 2014
BY KIM MOORE

The ubiquitous fast-food restaurant may be on the decline.


Read more...

Gender Code

September 2014
Tuesday, August 26, 2014
BY COURTNEY SHERWOOD

Janice Levenhagen-Seeley reprograms tech.


Read more...

November/December Preview: Revenge Forestry

News
Tuesday, October 14, 2014
BY JONATHAN FROCHTZWAJG

Seneca AW46A flare-up in the Elliott Forest raises questions about détente in Oregon’s timber wars.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS