BROOKINGS

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Friday, June 01, 2007

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“Why rent if you can own?” Elden Gossest asks. No, the Coldwell Banker real estate agent isn’t talking about cars. He’s referring to the Seascape Regional Center, a 32,300- square-foot office and retail space owned by California-based Hughes Development. When it opens later this month the 28 units, eight of which are residential units, will include an outlet mall, a coffee shop and a gym. Seascape sits on the site of a former farm at a prime location right off of Highway 101. Each of the units can be leased or purchased outright.


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