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A new magazine for Prineville

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Friday, June 01, 2007

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PRINEVILLE — This Crook County town may have lost a little business gloss when Les Schwab announced last year that it will move its headquarters to Bend, but it’s getting a little bit back with the debut of a glossy publication called Prineville magazine.

Published by Bend-based Cascadia Magazine Company, the 48-page magazine will debut June 22. Its focus is recreation and adventure activities in and around Prineville, and includes coverage of everything from big-game hunting to hiking. Its inaugural 15,000 copies will be stocked at visitor centers around the state and in local businesses, in addition to selling on newsstands.

Kyla Cheney, executive editor and co-publisher of Cascadia, says the new magazine will celebrate the “unique lifestyle” of Prineville. “It’s such an interesting place,” she says. “You still see the cowboy roots in everything. But there is a new renaissance in how we will plan growth in this exploding little town.”

Prineville’s population, now around 10,000, has been ignited in recent years by the influx of destination resorts, second-home buyers and the spillover from Redmond and Bend, 35 miles to the south. Tinier and more unassuming than its neighbors, it’s the only incorporated city in Crook County. Now it has its own spotlight.

“Prineville deserves a high-end magazine,” says co-publisher Pamela Hulse Andrews.

Cascadia also puts out Cascades East magazine, a quarterly recreation-focused glossy with a circulation of 16,000. Cheney says Prineville will start out as an annual, but she hopes to eventually publish it four times per year

Other players in the Central Oregon magazine market include Gusto, a food and wine magazine, and Bend Living, which premiered its new Bend Business Review this month.

— Robin Doussard


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