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Reader survey finds lack of retirement saving

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Friday, June 01, 2007

This month’s survey focusing on our readers’ personal financial situations finds them decidedly optimistic, with a large majority saying their finances have gotten better and that they expect that trend to continue. Yet a dark cloud looms on the horizon: funding their retirement.

In this they aren’t alone. The 910 respondents to our survey, conducted by research partner Conkling Fiskum & McCormick, mirror the angst of the over-40 population nationwide.

According to an AARP study, 68% of baby boomers plan to work beyond traditional retirement age, mostly because they need the money. Of all adults surveyed, three-quarters say saving for their retirement years is very important, but only 35% feel very confident that they will have enough money to live comfortably throughout their retirement years. Other findings:

  • 28% of workers and 12% of retirees say they are not confident about having enough money in retirement to pay for their medical expenses.

  • 40% of workers and 33% of retirees say they are not confident in their ability to take care of long-term care expenses should they occur during their retirement.

  • 15% of workers and 9% of retirees are not even confident they will have enough to take care of their basic expenses.

One-third of the workers in the national survey have not saved any money for their retirement; 26% admitted they aren’t sure they know how to determine how much money they will need to live comfortably in retirement.

And if they have saved, it’s pretty modest: Half of the workers’ households have less than $25,000 in their savings and investments, excluding the value of their primary residence. Why? It’s hard to save, they say, because of insufficient income, high everyday expenses and a bad economy. It is also evident from the AARP study that workers are counting on employer-provided benefits for their retirement.

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Research conducted by Conkling Fiskum & McCormick.



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