BEND

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Sunday, July 01, 2007

t_Map.Redmond

Doorjamb manufacturer Oregon Woodworking Co. is shutting down its Bend plant, citing international competition
specifically from China as a growing threat to the local lumber industry. The plant laid off about 30 workers since January and is fighting to stay above water, says Lisa Coats-Taylor, the company’s human resources director. The plant’s exact closing date is contingent upon exhausting all remaining lumber inventory.

Deschutes County has been ordered to review its approval of the Thornburg destination resort, a 1,000-home development 20 miles north of Bend. The state Land Use Board of Appeals’ decision focused on two areas: whether the county had appropriately addressed the resort’s ability to maintain the state-mandated ratio of overnight lodging to residential units, and whether the project provided adequate roads both of which are concerns that critics have voiced about other destination resorts projects under construction in Central Oregon. The county is not expected to appeal the ruling. Thornburg’s developers have said minor changes would be required but that the project would continue.


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