Green demand brings new mill to Morrow County

| Print |  Email
Sunday, July 01, 2007

CollinsPoplarFarm.jpg
Collins will mill wood from a poplar farm adjacent to its new facility.

BOARDMAN — While mills around the state are cutting back or shutting down, the Collins Cos. breaks ground this summer on a new $35 million sawmill in Boardman. With plans to process 60 million feet of logs per year by 2011 (enough to build 8,000 homes), it will be the largest hardwood mill on the West Coast.

Many mills haul timber all the way from Canada, but the new facility is literally adjacent to its timber source. Managed by GreenWood Resources in Portland, the 17,000-acre farm is Forest Stewardship Council-certified and grows a quick-growing species in the poplar family marketed as Pacific Albus. Used for products such as moldings, window frames and doors, its primary competition is wood from South America. Wade Mosby, Collins Cos. CEO, lays it out this way: “Would you rather buy a local, high-quality product or something shipped from the other side of the world?”

The venture will employ 150 people between the mill and the tree farm with wages exceeding the county average of $30,797. The average wage and benefits package at the sawmill will be about $46,000, garnering the support of the Oregon Economic and Community Development Department through the Enterprise Zone and Oregon Investment Advantage tax programs.

The Collins Cos., a family-owned business since 1855, is the first private U.S. forest products company to be independently certified by the Forest Stewardship Council. The company owns nearly 300,000 acres of certified sustainable forests and draws power for its Fremont mill in Lakeview from a biomass power plant. Steam from the biomass plant generates electricity for the mill, heats the plant in winter and is used to dry lumber.

A growing demand for eco-friendly lumber is expected to be spurred on even further by new green residential building standards and large companies such as Home Depot introducing “Eco Option” labeling. Mosby declined to give sales figures but says he’s seen a “substantial” growth in sales of the company’s sustainable products.

— Brooke Matschek

Have an opinion? E-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

More Articles

House of Clarity

July/August 2015
Monday, July 13, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

Holding a Power Lunch at Veritable Quandary in downtown Portland.


Read more...

Reader Input: Road Work

March 2015
Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Oregon's roads are crumbling, and revenues from state and local gas taxes are not sufficient to pay for improvements. We asked readers if the private sector should help fund transportation maintenance and repairs. Research partner CFM Strategic Communications conducted the poll of 366 readers in February.


Read more...

The 10 most successful crowdfunding campaigns in Oregon

The Latest
Wednesday, August 19, 2015
081915-crowdfundingmainBY JACOB PALMER | DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

One of the hottest new investment trends has proven quite lucrative for some companies.


Read more...

Photo Log: Shooting 10 innovators in rural health care

The Latest
Monday, August 03, 2015
007blogBY JASON E. KAPLAN | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

You may have noticed the photos of our rural health innovators departed from the typical Oregon Business aesthetic.


Read more...

Farm in a Box

July/August 2015
Friday, July 10, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

Most of the food Americans consume is trucked in from hundreds of miles away. Eric Wilson, co-founder and CEO of Gro-volution, wants to change that. So this past spring, the Air Force veteran and former greenhouse manager started work on an alternative farming system he claims is more efficient than conventional agriculture, and also shortens the distance between the consumer and the farm.


Read more...

The Cover Story

Linda Baker
Thursday, August 27, 2015
01-cover-0915-thumbBY LINDA BAKER

How do you put a baby on the cover of a business magazine without it looking too cutesy?


Read more...

Back to School

September 2015
Wednesday, August 19, 2015
BY CHRIS NOBLE

Oregon is home to an abundance of gritty warehouses reborn as trendy office spaces, as well as crafty hipsters turned entrepreneurs. Does the combination yield an equally bounteous office products sector? Not so much. Occupying the limited desk jockey space are Field Notes, a spinoff of Portland’s Draplin Design Company, and Schuttenworks, known for whittling Apple device stands. For a full complement of keyboard trays, docking stations and mouse pads, check out the GroveMade line, guaranteed to boost the cachet of even the lowliest cubicle drone. 


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS