Home Archives August 2007 Philanthropy: Going beyond the checkbook

Philanthropy: Going beyond the checkbook

| Print |  Email
Wednesday, August 01, 2007

Many Oregon companies are looking beyond their checkbooks to find creative ways to give. Here are some ideas for supporting local nonprofits:

In-kind contributions. Rather than providing actual cash, your organization can fulfill its philanthropic mission by donating physical goods or services to a local nonprofit. They include:

  • Products or services that are the basis of your business. For example, a restaurant may cater food at no charge for a nonprofit’s special event, a printing company may print the event program for free, and so on.

  • Building, construction and manufacturing industries can contribute labor or materials toward the expansion of nonprofit facilities or for specific construction projects.

  • Used office equipment. As businesses upgrade office equipment, items still in good working order are often welcome donations.

  • Bulk supplies. Become a partner with a local nonprofit organization and offer to add its need for bulk office supplies to your next order.


Employee volunteerism.

Many businesses make a difference by encouraging employees to volunteer for the organizations and causes that they care about.

  • Encourage employees to participate in volunteer work by offering paid time off.

  • Small nonprofits can be short on skilled staff that perform essential tasks such as legal, administration, bookkeeping and writing. Con-sider “loaning” your employees with particular abilities to an organization in need.

  • In association with employee volunteerism, you may want to consider a matching gift program that pledges a corporate donation that matches with hours volunteered or an employee’s financial donation to a specific cause.


Sponsorship.

Sponsorships can bring visibility and alignment with a good cause. Develop a plan that addresses how and when your organization will choose to be a sponsor, including what your obligations and benefits will be.  

By taking a new approach to corporate giving, your organization can develop strong partnerships that can make a positive impact.

— Greg Chaillé
president, Oregon Community Foundation


Have an opinion? E-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

More Articles

The more they change, the more they stay the same

March 2014
Tuesday, February 25, 2014
100-best-collageBY BRANDON SAWYER

The 100 Best Companies get more creative with perks and more generous with benefits; employees seek empowering relations with management and coworkers.


Read more...

Spring thaw

News
Thursday, April 17, 2014
Spring ThawBY JASON NORRIS | OB BLOGGER

The “polar vortex” of 2014 seems to have finally thawed and we believe this change in weather will bring more sunshine to the U.S. economy as well.


Read more...

Spreading the wealth

March 2014
Tuesday, February 25, 2014
HiResBY PAIGE PARKER

A money management firm broadens its reach. 


Read more...

How to handle the unexpected

Contributed Blogs
Friday, March 28, 2014
03.28.14 thumb disasterBY TOM COX | OB BLOGGER

The next mysterious (or disastrous) event could be one that you or your team might suddenly need to respond to, probably under intense scrutiny.


Read more...

Speeding up science

News
Tuesday, February 25, 2014
02.25.14 Thumbnail MedwasteBY JOE ROJAS-BURKE | OB BLOGGER

The medical research enterprise wastes tens of billions of dollars a year on irrelevant studies. It’s time to fix it.


Read more...

The 2014 List: The Top 33 Small Companies to Work, For in Oregon

March 2014
Thursday, February 27, 2014

100best14logoWebOur 100 Best Companies project turned 21 this year, so pop open the Champagne. Our latest survey gives us plenty to cheer.

 


Read more...

Airbnb laws will hurt Portland’s newest company

News
Wednesday, April 23, 2014
airbnb-logoBY CLIFF HOCKLEY | OB GUEST CONTRIBUTOR

Proposed regulations protect Portland’s strict zoning codes and hotel operators, but they may have an adverse effect on Airbnb’s business.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS