Home Archives September 2007 Business ethics fill the fall bookshelves

Business ethics fill the fall bookshelves

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Saturday, September 01, 2007

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BROWSE THE BUSINESS SECTION of the local bookstore and the majority of titles have a “follow my example” theme. If it’s true that the winners write history then it’s the successful business people who write how-to books. The hot business book trend of the moment is business ethics, according to Danielle Marshall from Portland’s Powells.com. Here is a sampling of the new books in this genre hitting the shelves this fall:

The Mindful Leader: Ten Principles for Bringing out the Best in Ourselves and Others

Human resources executive and meditation teacher Michael Carroll explains how to apply Buddhist mindfulness teaching to organizational leadership in this book developed around the idea that being fully present in the moment can lead to better leadership. Carroll outlines how simple steps can lead to mental clarity and stress reduction in the workplace.

Beyond Success: Building a Personal, Financial, and Philanthropic Legacy

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Randy Ottinger, former senior vice president for Bank of America’s private bank, spoke with affluent leaders and executives for this guide to establishing a meaningful financial and family legacy. His ideas include tips on preventing the “trust-fund baby” phenomenon.

Built to Serve: Leading a Sustainable, Culture-Driven, People-Centered Organization

United Supermarkets, a grocery chain throughout Texas, is known for its U-Crew volunteer teams. Each team performs community service projects in its local communities. In this book, Dan Sanders, former company CEO, explains the value volunteering occupies in the corporate world.

Leaving Microsoft to Change the World

John Wood had the type of executive job many would covet: Microsoft’s director of business development for China. In the late 1990s, inspired by a trip to the Himalayas, Wood decided to leave his job and establish Room to Read, a nonprofit aimed at providing an education for children in rural Asia and Africa. 



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