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New look, new stuff

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Saturday, September 01, 2007

s_Robin ROBIN DOUSSARD

By the time you’ve reached this page, you’ve no doubt started to notice that we’ve made a few changes to Oregon Business. We’ve spruced up our look and as you continue through the magazine, you’ll find we’ve added new features and improved some longtime favorites.

One of our changes is our new typefaces, from the Oregon Business banner on the cover, to the inside headline and text typefaces. When we first started planning our redesign several months ago, we knew a more modern, readable type was first on the list of must-dos, along with a fresh page design and color palette.

“We created a design that was clean and graphic,” says our art director, Jon Ferland. “Most of all we wanted to make it as smart as our readers.”

In addition to Jon’s smart work, we’ve also added new content. Because we don’t believe in all work and no play, we’ve created the Biz/Life department, which is devoted to the intersection of your business and leisure time. In this issue, we round up some of the hottest business books for this fall, offer a few glamorous ways to spend your money, and provide practical advice on employer-sponsored child care and hiring a salesperson.

Our ending punctuation to the magazine is called Next (p. 70), where we’ll focus on creative invented-in-Oregon products, gadgets and technology. This month, in the midst of the plastic bottle wars, one squishable bottle stands apart, and we tell you why.

These improvements stand alongside the insightful statewide business reporting that’s our hallmark, with stories such as our cover feature by associate editor Abraham Hyatt on how public universities are acting more and more like businesses (p. 38), and managing editor Christina Williams’ take on whether Silicon Forest is still fertile (p. 34). We’ve also added more news to our signature Around the State report (p. 12).

And our commitment to innovation and coverage of the state isn’t just limited to our printed word. This month, we hit the road for our statewide Business is Good! Tour, which kicks off Sept. 10 in Astoria, and winds up in Portland Oct. 5. There are 20 communities and hundreds of business and civic leaders participating in this celebration of the important and creative work done every day and in every corner of Oregon.

If you aren’t already involved, there’s still plenty of time to join the party. Go to www.oregonbusiness.com/tour for more details, or call tour coordinator Brooke Matschek for details (503.445.8820). It’s an extraordinary opportunity to connect to other leaders and gain a deeper understanding of our business community and its potential.

Let us know what you think about our new coat of paint, and we hope to see you on the tour. It promises to be a journey to remember.

 

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Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

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