Sponsored by Oregon Business

Marine reserves rankle ports, fishermen

| Print |  Email
Monday, October 01, 2007


OREGON COAST A push by Gov. Ted Kulongoski to create a network of marine reserves off the coast by 2009 has sparked serious concern among some port officials. They say the process is moving at a pace that doesn’t allow for adequate study of how reserves would affect the state’s commercial and sport fishing industries.

This summer the specter of reserves large enough to shut down fishing along 100-mile stretches of coast was raised. A meeting in Charleston of the Marine Reserves Working Group (a subcommittee of the Oregon Ocean Policy Advisory Council, or OPAC) saw heated comments from county commissioners and fishermen that ranged from how preliminary economic and scientific studies would be funded to whether there was even a need for reserves at all.

In August, commissioners at the Port of Newport approved a resolution that gave a nod to the benefits of reserves but listed 10 points — issues raised at the meeting — they want addressed in the planning process. Other ports are considering similar resolutions.

“There’s a risk that we’re getting the cart before the horse,” Don Mann, Newport port manager says. “The biggest risk is that we’re missing the opportunity to do the process right.”

Frank Warrens, chair of the Marine Reserves Working Group, says that because the process has not been well-defined, people are justified in being angry, and it’s been made worse by a lack of communication. “The wheels are beginning to come off,” Warrens says.

Warrens, a former charter fisherman, says he’s made suggestions to the governor’s office that he think will create changes in the process, specifically in how to increase public input.

The push for reserves started in 2002 with former Gov. John Kitzhaber. There have been several iterations of the idea, including a defunct proposal by Kulongoski for a reserve that would blanket 25,000 square miles off the coast. OPAC recommended against that idea, which kicked off the current round of planning. Now Kulongoski wants OPAC to come up with new recommendations by 2008 or 2009.

Several port managers say the push by the governor is what’s driving the accelerated pace, and they say it drives home the perception that there is little consideration for an industry that fishermen feel has been under attack for more than a decade.

Mark Freeman, port manager at the Port of Siuslaw in Florence, says marine reserve policy decisions need to be made and reconciled, in part, by the fishing industry. “There’s really a feeling that they’re not trying to manage fishing but manage fishermen and women,” he says.


Have an opinion? E-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


More Articles

Downtime with Patrick Criteser

October 2015
Monday, September 28, 2015

Live, Work Play with the President and CEO of Tillamook County Creamery Association.


Storyteller in Chief: Brew Stories

October 2015
Monday, September 28, 2015

Over the years, many mentors have taught me lessons that have helped shape the way I view the world of work and our business.


Big Trouble in China?

Guest Blog
Tuesday, August 18, 2015
0818-wellmanthumbBY JASON NORRIS | CFA

Earlier this month, the People’s Bank of China (PBoC) announced they were going to devalue their currency, the Renminbi. While the amount of the targeted change was to be roughly 2 percent, investors read a lot more into the move. The Renminbi had been gradually appreciating against the U.S. dollar (see chart) as to attempt to alleviate concerns of being labeled a currency manipulator.


Down on the Bayou

October 2015
Monday, September 28, 2015

A Power Lunch at Zydeco Kitchen and Cocktails in Bend.


Up on the Roof

September 2015
Wednesday, August 19, 2015

In 2010 Vanessa Keitges and several investors purchased Portland-based Columbia Green Technologies, a green-roof company. The 13-person firm has a 200% annual growth rate, exports 30% of its product to Canada and received its first infusion of venture capital in 2014 from Yaletown Venture Partners. CEO Keitges, 40, a Southern Oregon native who serves on President Obama’s Export Council, talks about market innovation, scaling small business and why Oregon is falling behind in green-roof construction. 


5 facts about the teaching profession in Oregon

The Latest
Thursday, October 08, 2015

Based on several metrics, Oregon has one of the lowest performing K-12 education systems in the country. Teacher compensation is part of the problem.


New green wood building product takes off in Oregon

Thursday, September 10, 2015
091115-cltjohnson-thumbBY KIM MOORE

Oregon is set to become a hub of a new type of wooden building design as a southern Oregon timber company becomes the first certified manufacturer of a high-tech wood product, known as cross-laminated timber, or CLT.

Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02