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Bling for the business executive

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Saturday, December 01, 2007

Who needs the stress of finding the perfect gift for the executive on your list? If money is no object, here are a few suggestions.

AMBER NOBECartierBallonBleu.jpg

Cartier says this season watches are anything but flat. Released just in time for the holidays is the newest addition to itsPatekCalatrava.jpg library of timepieces: the Ballon Bleu. This bubble-shaped watch features a sapphire-topped winding mechanism and a large dial face set in 18-karat gold. ($26,000 at Carl Greve)

For men, the Patek Philippe Calatrava is the icon of success, says Julie Hosler at Portland’s Carl Greve jeweler. “Patek Philippe is the only brand all other brands agree on as the epitome of watches.” ($19,900 at Carl Greve)

CandrianBelliPod.jpgThere are endless options for iPod protection, but none as stylish and savvy as the black kidskin case by Candrian Bell in Portland. The goat leather is laser cut, welded and stitched to fit. The leather molds to your iPod over time and is so thin you can scroll through it. ($75 and up at candrianbell.com)

To trick out your iPod even more, try the latest in tech accessorizing: laser etching. Prices depend on the complexity of the graphic and the size of the device. (deviceninesix.com, etchamac.com, adafruit.com/laser)

The Montegrappa Extra 1930 is the patron of pens. Each one is handmade in Italy from celluloid with sterling silver accents. Aaron Hubbell of Paradise Pen’s Portland store says the original 1930s Montegrappa was used by Ernest Hemingway, proving its distinguished look and craftsmanship stand the test of time – or at least longer than a bottle of tequila. ($690 for the roller ball, $1,100 for the fountain pen, at Paradise Pen)

DiamondStuds.jpgA staple in the businesswoman’s jewelry collection is a pair of diamond stud earrings. The Hearts on Fire diamonds at Carl Greve are billed as the world’s most perfectly cut diamonds. For the clueless gift-giver, these platinum-set sparklers are a safe bet. ($9,000 for .5 carat in each ear, $25,000 for 1 carat in each ear, at Carl Greve)

NIKOScufflinks.jpg Women may have their earrings, but men can get just as flashy with cufflinks. The Ploemiste square cufflinks by NIKOS, with 19-karat white gold and a blue carbon fiber pattern, add masculine flair to any suit. ($1,775 at Carl Greve)



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